News Articles 11 - 20 of 160

07
Dec
Women with HBV lose anti-cirrhosis advantage as they get older
News Type: Hepatology News

A new study of HBV patients shows that the protective effect against cirrhosis of being female is gradually lost with increasing age.

This multicentre study from China investigated the interaction of female gender and older age on the development of cirrhosis in patients recorded in the China Registry of HBV. A total of 17,809 chronic HBV patients were studied.

The prevalence of cirrhosis in the females increased faster than that in the males over 50 years old. Multivariate analysis showed that the increase of adjusted odds ratios for developing cirrhosis in females started to accelerate after 50 years of age: 11.19 in women versus 14.75 in men aged 50 to 59; 21.67 versus 24.4 at ages 60 to 69; and 18.78 versus 12.09 in those aged over 70.

The study authors suggest that disease progression should be monitored more closely in elderly women with chronic HBV.

Reference
Female gender lost protective effect against disease progression in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis B. You H, Kong Y, Hou J et al. Sci Rep. 2016 Nov 28;6: 37498

07
Dec
New studies show simeprevir plus sofosbuvir safe and effective in HCV
News Type: Hepatology News

Two otherwise unrelated studies have testified to the efficacy and safety of the combination of simeprevir and sofosbuvir in patients with HCV.

In the US-based GALAXY study, the combination, with or without ribavirin, was efficacious and well tolerated in patients with recurrent HCV genotype 1 post-orthotopic liver transplant (1).

Thirty-three such patients without cirrhosis were randomised into three arms: Arm 1, received simeprevir+sofosbuvir+ribavirin for 12 weeks; Arm 2, received simeprevir+sofosbuvir for 12 weeks; Arm 3 received simeprevir+sofosbuvir for 24 weeks; 13 additional subjects (two with cirrhosis, 11 without cirrhosis) entered Arm 3.

Among the randomised subjects, SVR12 was achieved by 81.8% in Arm 1, 100% in Arm 2, and 93.9% in Arm 3; two subjects did not achieve SVR12: one viral relapse

(follow-up Week 4; Arm 1) and one missing follow-up Week 12 data. Five subjects had a serious adverse event, considered unrelated to treatment per investigator.

In Spain’s PLUTO study, the combination of simeprevir plus sofosbuvir for 12 weeks resulted in SVR12 rates of 100% in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients with HCV genotype 4 with or without compensated cirrhosis, and was well tolerated (2).

Forty patients received the combination for 12 weeks. Seven of the patients had compensated cirrhosis. All achieved SVR12. Adverse events, all Grade 1 or 2, were reported in 20 patients. No serious adverse events were reported and no patients discontinued study treatment. Grade 3 treatment-emergent laboratory abnormalities occurred in two patients.

References

Efficacy and safety of simeprevir and sofosbuvir with and without ribavirin in subjects with recurrent genotype 1 hepatitis C post-orthotopic liver transplant: the randomized GALAXY study. O'Leary JG, Fontana RJ, Brown K et al. Transpl Int. 2016 Nov 29 [Epub ahead of print]

Simeprevir in combination with sofosbuvir in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection: a Phase III, open-label, single-arm study (PLUTO). Buti M, Calleja JL, Lens S et al. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2016 Nov 29 [Epub ahead of print]

05
Dec
Hepatocellular carcinoma increase rate slows in USA
News Type: Hepatology News

The overall rate of increase in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) slowed between 2010 and 2012, found a nationwide US study. However, it did increase in some sub-groups such as men aged 55 to 64, and whites/Caucasians.

 

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas analysed data from the US Cancer Statistics registry, which covers 97% of the population of all 50 states.

 

They found that the HCC incidence increased from 4.4/100,000 in 2000 to 6.7/100,000 in 2012, increasing by 4.5% annually between 2000 and 2009, but only by 0.7% annually between 2010 and 2012.

 

The average annual percentage change (AAPC) between 2000 and 2012 was higher in men (increase of 3.7%) than women (increase of 2.7%), and highest in 55 to 59-year-olds (AAPC 8.9%) and 60 to 64-year-olds (AAPC 6.4%).

 

By 2012, rates in Hispanics surpassed those in Asians, and rates in Texas surpassed those in Hawaii (9.71/100,000 vs 9.68/100,000). Geographic variation within individual race and ethnic groups was observed, but rates were highest in all major race and ethnic groups in Texas.

 

Reference

 

Incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in all 50 United States, from 2000 through

2012. White DL, Thrift AP, Kanwal F et al. Gastroenterology. 2016 Nov 23 [Epub ahead of print]

29
Nov
Three anti-HCV regimens “highly effective” in achieving SVR
News Type: Hepatology News

A comparison of three different anti-HCV regimens concluded that all of them appeared highly effective in achieving sustained virologic response (SVR).

A study at the University of Southern California compared the SVR rates achieved 12 weeks post-treatment in 11,464 patients treated with three such agents by the Veterans Health Administration.

Without controlling for other risk factors, a SVR at least 12 weeks post treatment was achieved in 92% of ledipasvir/ sofosbuvir, 86% of ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir/dasabuvir, and 83% of simeprevir/sofosbuvir patients.

After adjusting for patient characteristics, simeprevir/sofosbuvir (93.3%) and ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (96.2%) patients were statistically more likely than ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir/dasabuvir (91.8%) patients to demonstrate a SVR.

HIV, HBV, diabetes, obesity, previous treatment history and augmentation therapy using ribavirin did not impact the SVR rates. Sustained SVR rates were lower for patients under age 65, with cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, indications of fibrosis or a non-genotype 1 infection. Women and Caucasian patients were more likely to achieve a SVR.

 
Reference

Comparative treatment effectiveness of direct acting antiviral regimens for hepatitis C: data from the Veterans Administration. Fox DS, McGinnis JJ, Tonnu-Mihara I et al. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016 Nov 21 [Epub ahead of print]

28
Nov
Hepatitis increases risk of uveitis
News Type: Hepatology News

A new study finds that people with viral hepatitis are at an increased risk of uveitis, particularly those with both HBV and HCV.

Researchers at China Medical University, Taichung, used data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance system to identify 17,389 patients newly diagnosed with viral hepatitis between 2000 and 2011 and matched these with 34,778 controls.

The risk of uveitis in the hepatitis cohort was 1.30-fold. Those with HBV and HCV coinfection had the highest risk (hazard ratio = 2.88), followed by HCV only infection (hazard ratio 1.75). Patients with cirrhosis had a higher risk in the multivariable model but did not attach statistic difference.

Reference

Relationship between uveitis, different types of viral hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis: a 12-year nationwide population-based cohort study. Tien PT, Lin CJ, Tsai YY et al. Retina. 2016 Dec;36(12):2391-2398

28
Nov
Statins reduce HCC risk in people with type 2 diabetes
News Type: Hepatology News

The use of statins by people with type 2 diabetes may help them avoid developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), new evidence suggests.
 
Researchers at Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, carried out a Korean nationwide population-based study involving 47,738 patients with type 2 diabetes.
 

After at least a five-year HCC-free period there were 229 incident HCC cases and 1,145 matched controls. Of these 229 incident HCC cases, 27 were statin users, whereas 378 were statin users among 1,145 controls.
 
Statin use was associated with a reduced risk of HCC development (adjusted odds ratio 0.36) after adjustment for chronic viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, alcoholic liver disease, previous cancer, aspirin use, insulin use, sulfonylurea use, metformin use, thiazolidinedione use, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Charlson comorbidity score, household income level, and residential area.
 
The risk reduction was accentuated with an increase of cumulative defined daily doses (cDDD) compared with non-users (adjusted odds ratios 0.53, 0.36, 0.32, and 0.26 in ≤60, 60-180, 181-365, and >365cDDD, respectively).
 
The risk reduction was apparent in the presence of liver disease (adjusted odds ratio 0.27), including heterogeneous groups of clinical diagnosis of liver disease, but not significant in the absence of liver disease (adjusted odds ratio 0.64).
 
Reference
 
Effect of statin on hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with type 2 diabetes: A
nationwide nested case-control study. Kim G, Jang SY, Han E et al. Int J Cancer. 2016 Nov 7 [Epub ahead of print]
 

21
Nov
Liver cancer risk reduced in patients cured of HCV
News Type: Hepatology News

 A large study found that the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced by 80% in people cured of HCV compared to those who were not cured.

This was a study of the entire population of people treated for HCV in British Columbia province, Canada, between 1990 and 2013. The study identified 8147 people treated with interferon-based regimens, 57% of whom were cured. Treated individuals were followed for a median of 5.6 years.

The liver cancer incidence was highest among those with cirrhosis who did not achieve a SVR (21 cases per 1000 patient-years of follow-up). In comparison, the liver cancer incidence was 6.4 per 1000 patient-years in those with cirrhosis who achieved SVR, 7.2 in those without cirrhosis who did not achieve SVR12 and 1.1 per 1000 patient-years in those without cirrhosis who achieved SVR12.

In a multivariable analysis liver cancer was associated with cirrhosis, age over 50 years, genotype three infection versus genotype one, alcohol consumption and being male in those who were not cured. In those who were cured of hepatitis C, only cirrhosis, age over 50 and being male were associated with an increased risk of liver cancer.

The researchers concluded that although curing HCV greatly reduces the risk of developing liver cancer, it does not eliminate the risk entirely. Older people and those with cirrhosis are at higher risk than others, underlining the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

Reference

The impact of sustained virological response to HCV infection on long term risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: the BC Hepatitis Testers Cohort. Janjua NZ et al. The 67th Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston 2016. Abstract 175

 

 

21
Nov
Sofosbuvir plus velpatasvir “best options” for HCV G3
News Type: Hepatology News

An analysis of published studies on direct acting antivirals (DAAs) found that regimens containing sofosbuvir and velpatasvir were the best option for patients with HCV genotype three (G3).

The analysis indicated that ribavirin significantly increased rates of SVR and should be considered if tolerated.

Researchers at Radboud University Medical Centre in the Netherlands performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis using a random effects model to indirectly compare DAA regimens in HCV G3 patients with and without cirrhosis. They found 27 appropriate studies involving 3,415 patients.

Among patients without cirrhosis, the greatest rates of SVR were estimated for those receiving sofosbuvir + velpatasvir with ribavirin (99%) and without ribavirin (97%), for sofosbuvir + daclatasvir + ribavirin (96%), and for sofosbuvir + peginterferon + ribavirin (95%), all for 12 weeks.

Among patients with cirrhosis, the highest rates of SVR were estimated for those receiving sofosbuvir + velpatasvir for 24 weeks (96%), for sofosbuvir + daclatasvir + ribavirin for 24 weeks (94%), and for sofosbuvir + velpatasvir + ribavirin for 12 weeks (94%).

Ribavirin increases efficacy in patients with and without cirrhosis (odds ratios 2.6 and 4.5).

Reference

Identification of the best direct-acting antiviral regimen for patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 3 infection: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Berden FA, Aaldering BR, Groenewoud H et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016 Nov 10 [Epub ahead of print]

21
Nov
Psychosocial distress worsens in families during HCV treatment
News Type: Hepatology News

A new study suggests young people being treated for HCV and their families experience increasing psychosocial distress.

During the study period, 10 children with HCV and their families began treatment at New York’s Icahn School of Medicine. Each family was given a battery assessing patient quality of life, caregiver distress related to their child's illness and overall family functioning.

At baseline, the patients displayed a poorer quality of life than population norms, caregiver distress was elevated and family functioning was also in the "stressed" range. After treatment, all parameters worsened.

The researchers suggest caregivers may benefit from additional support given the implications of HCV and grueling nature of its treatment. Broadly, the impact of continuous intensive treatments on families perhaps should be monitored.

Reference

Children with hepatitis C: the impact of disease and treatment on patients, caregivers and families. Annunziato RA, Lee SG, Galici E et al. J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Nov 8 [Epub ahead of print]

14
Nov
Large gaps in HCV and HBV testing in Europe
News Type: Hepatology News

There are large gaps in the quality and diversity of HCV and HBV testing in many European countries, a literature review suggests.
 
Reviewers from the University of Copenhagen found 136 English-language studies from 24 European countries published between January 2007 and June 2013. Most of the studies took place in six countries: France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.
 
Thirty-seven studies addressed HBV, 46 addressed HCV, and 53 addressed both diseases. The largest categories of study populations were people who use drugs (18%) and health care patient populations (17%). Far fewer studies focused on migrants, prison inmates, or men who have sex with men. The reviewers concluded that more research is needed throughout Europe to guide efforts to provide testing to certain key populations.
 

Reference
 
Are the testing needs of key European populations affected by hepatitis B and
hepatitis C being addressed? A scoping review of testing studies in Europe. Lazarus JV, Sperle I, Spina A et al. Croat Med J. 2016 Oct 31;57(5):442-456